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She was living in a constant fear that something important and nice in her life she will miss. She traveled a lot and suffered even more when she did not travel. She felt like the real fun and happiness are always somewhere else.

Constantly she was full of plans and how to catch them by the tail, how to – in constant movement – find that crystalline moment when – at least so it’s said in dreams – life turns into a fairy tail.

 

Travel 0

Koblenz, Deutschland

Visiting the Burg Eltz it was inevitable to stroll down the hills of  Rhineland-Palatinate and explore.

To be honest, the navigation was not up to date as bringing us to the closed local roads or reserved only for the local agricultural vehicles. But there is a beauty in getting lost like that! ūüôā

Around the hills in Wierschem

Koblenz is a German city on the banks of the river Rhine and of the Moselle, a multi-nation tributary. Thanks to its geographic position, it is one of the most beautiful vineyards location. Let me tell you our entrance to the city with this:

Schloss von der Leyen

On our right is the river Moselle, on the left the vineyards scenery on the cliffs and we are driving right through the castle. The fairytale!

No wonder, Koblenz was established as a¬†Roman¬†military post around 8 B.C. Its name originates from the¬†Latin(ad) cŇćnfluentńďs, meaning¬†confluence.¬†The actual confluence is today known as the “German Corner“, a symbol of the¬†unification of Germany¬†that features an¬†equestrian statue of Emperor William I.

Opposite to this Deutsches Ecke – where the river Rhein and Moselle confluence and continue towards Rotterdam is the Fortress Ehrenbreitstein as seen from Koblenz.

Fortress Ehrenbreitstein as seen from Koblenz

The old city has a triangular shape, with two sides being bounded by the Rhine and Mosel and the third by a line of fortifications. The city facades are neo-baroque and classical. With loads of shopping streets and commercial centers interfered. It the Altstadt one can find bars and restaurants to enjoy german culinary and recommended wines from the valleys of Rhine and Mosel.

I couldn’t skip The cultural centre Forum Mittelrhein and the Kulturbau Forum Confluentesstands as a singular, solitary volume on the square and is wrapped in a striking, partly translucent shiny fa√ßade that reflects the sky and the clouds. It houses the public library, the Mittelrhein Museum and the tourist information of Koblenz, with their ‚ÄėZentrum der Rheinromantik‚Äô, inviting both tourists and residents to learn more about this beautiful region.

To conclude with the Rhine riesling and Mosel gewurztraminer.

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Burg Eltz, Deutschland

Eltz Castle (German: Burg Eltz) is a medieval castle nestled in the hills above the Moselle between Koblenz and Trier, Germany. It is still owned by a branch of the same family (the Eltz family) that lived there in the 12th century, 33 generations ago.

Hidden in the western Germany, in the hills above river Mosel, deep deep in the Rhineland Palatinate region hence only local roads lead you towards. Because of this, it is pretty easy to get lost.

Rhineland -Palatinate is a southwest German state bordered by France, Belgium and Luxembourg. The lush Moselle Valley, with its riverside towns is one of Germany’s largest wine regions.

We parked the car some hour away of the castle and started our trip through the forest. There are many paths through the forest but the one towards the castle is guiding you by itself.

Upon the entrance, I was surprised with the view on the nearby forests and the endless greenery. It was in a total contrast of the strong fortification and its red wooden construction.

Time for food? Some good German bier and sausage?

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Tournai, Belgium

Guess what’s new? – Corona. Guess how long it will last? – China.

Never mind. The travel ban is still on for Belgium, so explorations within the country continues. This weekend was reserved for Tournai. A beautiful city on the west of Belgium. Kinda looks like Lille at the first sight. ¬†Although, being part of the province of¬†Hainaut, Tournai is part of¬†Eurometropolis Lille‚ÄďKortrijk‚ÄďTournai.

Tournai is one of the oldest cities in Belgium and has played an important role in the country’s cultural history. It was the first capital of the¬†Frankish Empire, with¬†Clovis I¬†being born here – the first king of France, crowned and buried in Reims.

Tournai, known as Tornacum, was a place of minor importance in Roman times, a stopping place where the Roman road from Cologne on the Rhine to Boulogne on the coast crossed the river Scheldt. It came into the possession of the Salian Franks in 5th century. Clovis moved the center of power to Paris. In turn, a native son of Tournai, Eleutherius, became bishop of the newly created bishopric of Tournai, extending over most of the area west of the Scheldt. In 9th century Charles the Bald, first king of Western Francia and still to become Holy Roman Emperor, would make Tournai the seat of the County of Flanders.

river Scheldt

After the partition of the Frankish empire by the Treaties of Verdun (843) Tournai remained in the western part of the empire, which in 10th century became France. The city participated in 11th-century rise of towns with a woollen cloth industry based on English wool, which soon made it attractive to wealthy merchants. An ambitious rebuilding of the cathedral was initiated in 11th century. The stone Pont des Trous over the Scheldt, with defensive towers at either end, was built in 1290, replacing an earlier wooden structure.

Le Pont des Trous à Tournai

During the 15th century, the city’s textile trade boomed and it became an important supplier of¬†tapestry. The art of painting flourished too. It was¬†captured in 1513¬†by¬†Henry VIII of England, making it the only Belgian city ever to have been ruled by England. The city was handed back to French rule three years later, following the¬†Treaty of London (1518).

Belfry of Tournai

In 16th century, Habsburg Emperor Charles V added the city to his possessions in the so-called Low Countries, leading to a period of religious strife and economic decline. During the 16th century, Tournai was a bulwark of Calvinism, but eventually it was conquered by the Spanish governor of the Low Countries, the Duke of Parma, following a prolonged famous Siege of Tournai in 1581. After the fall of the city, its Protestant inhabitants were given one year to sell their possessions and emigrate, a policy that was at the time considered relatively humane, since very often religious opponents were simply massacred.

Monument of local artist van der Wayden, in front of the Cathedral, 15th century

One century later, the city briefly returned to France under Louis XIV in the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. Following the Napoleonic Wars, Tournai formed part of the newly independent Belgium.

Unfortunately, local specialties were skipped this time as the bars and restaurants were closed.

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Route des ūüćá vins d’Alsace ūüćá

Two days reserved for doing this route ūüôā My travel soul was reaching its immortal stage. Let me show you which route we took:

Our very first wine cellar was the winery Turckheim. We took a nice walk through the city of Turckheim, again colombage or in english; timber houses forming the line of endless streets of the city. Afterwards we climbed the hills of Turckheim, and we had a view to see:

The road continued through many small cities with timbered houses, churches and wine cellars. We stopped so many times just to take the smell of the view. As odd as it sounds.

Next stop: Stoeckle! Boy that was an atmosphere. When I heard the music from the hill, it reminded me on my home region in Croatia: the Zagorje

Immediate stop, entrance to the wine cellar full of people and owner blowing into horn tube, playing the traditional song of Alsace. Here I tried all the possibilities of the wine of Alsace: Sylvaner, Pinot Blanc, Riesling, Muscat d’Alsace, Pinot Gris and Gewurztraminer, Cremant d’Alsace, and the rose made of Pinot Noir. I think that night I was in the mood to buy entire cellar.

Continuing the road, hitting the best moments of the golden hour and the best medieval cities on our way.

Next stop: Achilee. Don’t ask how we managed to stop there, but the vibe of this cellar was odd. The wine host was very nice and welcoming, while xplaining how the bio in his wines actually means performance to the full moon etc. I looked at the barrels, they looked happy. So what the heck, bring the degustation on the table! ūüôā

Protected by the natural barrier of the Vosges Mountains, the vineyards of Alsace benefit from a unique climate and a variety of different grape-growing districts. The many different grape varieties which thrive here produce an incomparable range of rich and aromatic wines, from the driest and most delicate to the most opulent and full-bodied. The Alsace Wine Route, one of the oldest in France, crosses these different wine districts. From Marlenheim to Thann, it allows you to discover 170 km of scenic landscapes, from medieval villages and half-timbered houses decorated with flowers, to castles and Roman and Gothic churches. Enjoy!

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Colmar, Alsace, France ūü•®

In the northeastern France lays Alsace, the region so much popular in Europe as it used to be German, French, German and then again French. No wonder people of Alsace speak German-French dialect and share French-German type of food. Oh, and wine! There is nothing better than sitting on a terrace of a bar with the view on collombage (timber-houses) and having a taste of vin d’Alsace. ūüôā

Colmar’s old quarter is as complete as it is lovely, with street after street of corbelled wooden houses and sophisticated renaissance palaces decorated with flowers. We were so lucky to have an accommodation in the city center in one of the old wooden houses from 15th century. This was total experience!

Colmar was first mentioned by Charlemagne in his chronicle about Saxon wars. This was the location where the Carolingian Emperor Charles the Fat held a diet in 884. Colmar was granted the status of a free imperial city by Emperor Frederick II in 13th century and became the part of Holy Roman Empire of Germans. Check my story about Nurnberg visit and you will understand more.

Alsace is famous for storks so on many places there were these birds, reminding about the fertility and family times. There were less in the city but once outside of the city, you can see many of them flying around building the nests.

Fooooooood ūüôā Boy I enjoyed ūüôā Although the bars were not opened yet, the Marche couvert offered us variety of alsacian specialties. In the end, we bought 2 beautiful Flammekueche (Alsatian), or tarte flamb√©e (French) and ate them back in the hotel, with a glass of fine vin d’Alsace. Little things in life…

To follow the rules of my Grandfather, we are missing now only the church. The museums we could have not visit due to the chinese virus performance.

√Čglise Saint-Martin ‚Äď 13th century is the largest church of Colmar and one of the largest in Haut-Rhin. Displays some early stained glass windows, several Gothic and Renaissance sculptures and altars, a grand Baroque organ case. The choir is surrounded by an ambulatory opening on a series of Gothic chapels, a unique feature in Alsatian churches.

Definitely worth to visit for a nice weekend getaway. Next stop> many at the Route des Vins d’Alsace ūüôā

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Plitvice lakes & Rastoke, Croatia

The oldest and largest national park in Croatia in the mountainous karst area of central Croatia with the many rivers passing through among which the biggest one is river Korana.

They say one needs to visit Plitvice in all four seasons. Me so far missing only the winter when the waterfalls became frozen castles above the frozen white lakes.

The national park is world-famous for its lakes arranged in cascades. Sixteen lakes can be seen from the surface. There are three different paths to go through, depending on your walking capabilities. We choose the one that is 8 km long which takes 4 to 6 hours to go through – depending how much you stop to admire.

he lakes are all interconnected and follow the water flow. They are separated by natural dams of travertine, which is deposited by the action of moss, algae, and bacteria. The particularly sensitive travertine barriers are the result of an interplay between water, air and plants.

People usually admire the waters of Croatia for being so clean, transparent and genuinely rivers flow everywhere. Although it is under UNDESCO protection, I can see more and more the waters being polluted with the number of tourists and weekend houses around the Park without proper system arrangement for the waste water.

Finally, the village next door is Rastoke, famous for it small wooden houses that grow around the tiny lakes and waterfalls. It is an etno-village with the mills.

Rastoke is a place of autochthonous ecologic and ethnographic significance due to its symbiosis of natural and civilizational features. Visiting Rastoke after so many years, I have noticed that the village is becoming bigger and bigger with more house owners appearing. ūüôā

After all these walks, we deserved a plate of nice local meal: trout and potato grilled and served with lots of love in the Feniks restaurant Feniks in the city of Slunj.

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Bamberg blue, Germany

How to travel when China creates the virus, when European Union mismanages the coordination of vaccination and Belgium sets the travel ban? How to explain to your travel heart that far destinations are impossible?

In the pursuit of some beautiful precious gems among German towns, especially after last year visit to Rothenburg ob der Tauber we discovered Bamberg, Bavarians like to think of it as its own Rome. It is a magnificent medieval town full of typical medieval half timbered framework full of lavish splendour and playful decorative elements.

To be more accurate, Bamberg is a town in Upper Franconia, which is part of Bavaria, on the river Regnitz close to its confluence with the river Main which is part of the Main-Danube canal, one of the most important river canals of Europe.

The town dates back to the 9th century. From the 10th century onwards, Bamberg became a key link with the Slav peoples, notably those of Poland and Pomerania. It experienced a period of great prosperity from the 12th century onwards, during which time it was briefly the centre of the Holy Roman Empire. Emperor Henry II was also buried in the old town, alongside his wife Kunigunde.

This Holy Roman Emperor Henry II ordered the building of a new cathedral, which was consecrated in 1012. Pope Benedict VIII visited Bamberg in 1020 to meet Henry II for discussions concerning the Holy Roman Empire. For a short time Bamberg was the centre of the Holy Roman Empire. Henry and Kunigunde were both buried in the cathedral. Pope Clement ll as well, as the only Pope behind the Alps.

Unfortunately, I didn’t manage to enter as the cathedral is closed due to virus outbreak. Nevertheless, on the other side lays the Neue Hofhaltung, residence of the bishops since the 17th centuries.

When you visit Bamberg, there’s no way you can miss the town’s most iconic attraction. Sitting on a tiny island connected by grand bridges is the Bamberg Old Town Hall. In German the Altes Rathaus, this historical landmark is as unusual as it is stunning.

Running along the river bank called Linker Regnitzarm, there is a row of houses that showcase Bamberg’s traditional side. Each narrow house, some of which are half-timbered, has their own little garden. They are gathered around the old port which today serves only as a meeting point.

Getting lost in the city center, admiring the typical Bavarian timber houses which are traditional guest houses and restaurants, I couldn’t hide my sadness seeing them closed. A foodie like me likes to sit in the restaurant, try the local specialties, admire the surroundings. None of this was possible because of Corona virus outbreak.

Bamberg is known for its smoked¬†Rauchbier¬†and is home to nine breweries. So I promised myself to come back to Bamberg to finish the mission. It seems to me like I haven’t properly visit the city.

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Roche-en-Ardenne

Still pandemic times, less travels and huge desire to go somewhere new. In case I haven’t mention yet, thank you China. One big f***ing thank you.

Anyways, how about some snow? Belgian Ardennes are a good answer. Fresh and healthy winter air with lots of white cover.

Why this city? Except the fact that we are not allowed to leave this country of Belgium if it is not an essential travel, there has been a rumour that Roche-en-Ardenne is  is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the Ardennes.

La Roche is believed to have first been settled in the Neolithic era followed by the Celts and the Romans who built a fort there following their conquest of Gaul and the Ardennes.

The town’s medieval castle was in use between the 9th and 18th centuries. It provided protection to the many barges that plied their trade along the local river systems.

In World War II, the town was occupied by both Nazi and Allied forces, suffering severe damage. Freed by Americans in September 1944, the town was recaptured by the Germans in December, during the Battle of the Bulge. I was particularly surprised with the Museum of the Ardennes Battle.

The museums tells the story of local people fighting for their city. Belgian King Leopold I was advised to move his most ekite artillery and infantry towards Antwerpen thinking Hitler would never break strong cold Ardenne mountains. It happens that Hitler arrived with tanks, entered into every village in Ardennes in no second and broke Belgium. The fall of France and The Netherlands was the direct consequence of it.

The city is walking area with lots of shops, bars and restaurants. Thank you China so much for allowing me to enjoy this! We were allowed to walk down the Quay of Ourthe.

Never visit The Ardennes without buying the delicious local products: cheese, sausage made of boar and local beers. Here is what we brought home ūüôā

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The Lady of the Rivers

The Lady of the Rivers is a  historical novel by Philippa Gregory, part of her series The Cousins’ War.

The story is narrated by¬†Jacquetta of Luxembourg, mother of¬†Elizabeth Woodville, and covers the reign of the Lancastrian King¬†Henry VI.¬†The novel serves as a¬†prequel¬†to¬†The White Queen, the story of Elizabeth’s reign as¬†Queen consort of England.

 Lady Rivers and her Children. Elizabeth Woodville, daughter of Earl Rivers and later wife of Edward IV

Fourteen-year-old Jacquetta, whose noble family claims descendance from the water goddess Melusine, learns the secrets of her inherited powers from her great-aunt the Demoiselle of Luxembourg. Jacquetta befriends Joan of Arc, who is a prisoner at her uncle’s castle, but later watches in horror as Joan is burned at the stake by the English-backed church. 

The country is plunged into civil war between Lancaster and York led by Richard of York

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N√ľrnberg, Deutschland ūüćĽ

Tourism is sometimes challenging. There is a struggle that popped this time to understand this city. I didn’t get it by first. Sometimes, it‚Äôs difficult to swallow. 

Understanding N√ľrnberg. Don’t mind the hair, I was previously partying for 7 days in my hometown Croatia

In the case of Nuremberg, we are talking about the actions and horrors done by Adolf Hitler whose legacy to Nuremberg is a tainted, poisoned one. It was his favourite city leading in rich Germanic and imperial history. It is used to be called the ‚Äúmost German of German cities.‚ÄĚ

Maxbr√ľcke (bridge) over river Pegnitz

Nuremberg became the venue for the Nazi Party and later the place of the Nuremberg Trials Рit had to compensate somehow to skip the historical judgment. The city and it’s residents paid a hefty price for Nazi Germany’s obsession with the city. Nevertheless, the locals rebuilt the city, but much of the city’s original character and medieval charm got lost.

Way of Human Rights – outdoor sculpture designed by Israeli artist

So, Nurnberg is the second biggest city in Bavaria, just after Munich. The first documentary mention of the city, in 1050, referring the King Konrad III and Frederick I, Barbarossa Holy Roman Emperor (mostly famous for leading the Crusades).

We have visited the Imperial castle but unfortunately had no time to enter.

In the medieval times, the city was flourishing as being the free city for trade. Plague was coming many times but the city managed to sustain.

These are the times of the great painter Albrecht D√ľrer. He was born in this city and made his best works.

The cultural flowering of Nuremberg, in the 15th and 16th centuries, made it the centre of the German Renaissance. In 1525, Nuremberg accepted the Protestant Reformation which led into construction of the churches not so rich as it can be seen in other catholic cities.

Weißer Turm (White tower) and the Ehekarussell fountain (marriage carousel Рrepresenting marriage from beginning to end both good and bad moments)
Fachwerkhaus – the house with wooden construction

The large market square located at the heart of the city centre is surrounded by a multitude of must-see sights. The daily market takes place here, where you can buy all sorts of tasty treats, flowers and spices. 

Schöner Brunnen Рfountain with the sculptures of all the Holy Roman Emperors

The main square is the most vivid during the winter times. The Christmas market originates from this city = the so called Christkindelmarktplatz.

Church of Our Lady at the main square

Finaly, what is Germany if there is no good beer and sausage?

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Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Deutschland

In case you want to experience Bavaria region in south of Germany and get lost in time and space, I definitely recommend you this city. It is well known for its well-preserved medieval old town, a destination for tourists from around the world. It is part of the popular Romantic Road through southern Germany.

The name “Rothenburg ob der Tauber” is German for Red fortress above the Tauber, as the town is located on a plateau overlooking the Tauber river.

So these was our entrance to the city surrounded by the wall. The Markus tower, preserved from 15th century. Our hotel was in this tower. Let me show you the creepiness…

The Markusturm and Röderbogen

Upon our arrival to the hotel, a lovely Lady in Bavarian clothes took our check in and helped us to find the room. Little did I know that she was Bosnian (immigration wave in the Balkans is huge and Germany is always looking for work-force). However, I was a bit surprised hearing the accent. ūüôā Later we found out that her husband is the chef in the same hotel. Oh Balkans around the world…

The hotel is the medieval tower so the halls on each floor are going in the circle. Not to mention the wooden floors, squeaky stairs, creepy porcelain dolls in the baby carts, old wooden furniture from medieval times. etc. It had a soul, dolphinately! ūüź¨

Hauptmarkt (main square)

Due to chinese virus situation we were allowed to stay in the Biergarten restaurant for no longer than 2 hours. Fair enough. We had to continue to hit the road the next day so not much left for partying. Except that it was my birthday that night. ūüôā

Upon breakfast, quick look on the city on our way to the car. Enjoy!

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Amiens, France

Some 100 km north from Paris, in Normandy is chick city of Amiens. I say chick cause it totally anonymous but elegant and worth to visit.

The city is famous for the largest gothic cathedral in France. There is a marty – left hand of St John Baptist. The right hand, with which he baptised Jesus is in Istanbul.

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Honfleur and Le Havre, France

Another day in Normandie.

Honfleur

Honfleur is a perfect city for one day visit. It is located in the North France. It is especially known for its old port, characterized by its houses with slate-covered frontages, painted many times by artists, including in particular the impressionists like Claude Monet forming the école de Honfleur (Honfleur school) which contributed to the appearance of the Impressionist movement.

The first written record of Honfleur is a reference by Richard III, Duke of Normandy, in 1027. By the middle of the 12th century, the city represented a significant transit point for goods from Rouen to England.

The town’s defences were strengthened by¬†Charles V (the Habsburg). If you follow my blog and read the articles across, you will make the link.

And the continued with very good sea food.

The port is now a busy tourist spot so there are many good sea food restaurants around.

It is very important to visit the Church of Saint Catherine of Alexandria.

It was built on the model of a market hall, using naval construction techniques, which gives the impression of an upside-down ship’s hull.¬†

The city is situated on the bank of the estuary of the Seine across from le Havre and very close to the exit of the Pont de Normandie. We took our day and decided to cross the bridge.

Le Havre

An urban French commune. And I would say not much to this. Industry.

It is situated on the right bank of the¬†estuary¬†of the¬†river Seine¬†on the¬†Channel. The name¬†Le Havre¬†means “the harbour” or “the port”.

Largely destroyed during the Second World War, the city was rebuilt. The Church of Saint Joseph du Havre, built by Auguste Perret, dominates the city with its spire 107m high.

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The Ardennes ‚õįÔłŹ


The Ardennes is the name given to a region of Belgium in the south that extends into Luxembourg, France and Germany. This southern region is totally different from the busy, industrial north. The things available to do in this region are as varied as you might imagine and include some great museums, plenty of beer and even the world‚Äôs smallest city. Given the rolling hills and the lush green scenery, it will not surprise you that The Ardennes has become a popular spot for travellers who love the outdoors. 

We started our day at 9am travelling to Bouillon, chasing the Templars.

The landscape aside the highway was full of green grass, deep forests, cows and sheeps. My heart was warm.

Tombeau du Géant

There is a magnificent open view at Devil’s view, looking across to ‘Le Tombeau du G√©ant’ (The Giant’s Tomb), so named because one of the bends in the Semois at this point seems to enclose a coffin of gigantic proportions. It is not easy to reach it. We walked an hour through the forest athough the tracks are pretty good marked.

Saint-Hubert

Cozy little town actually hides many secrets. Hubert was actually a prince of Liege. Being passionately in love with hunting, perhaps too passionately, one day he saw a deer with the christian cross on his horns. The deer asked not to be killed and advised prince to live modesty. So prince became a monk and the patron of hunters. And later of this city.

Wéris

Well known for its megaliths from pre-historic times. Most probably Celts. It is a nice little village with stone houses and some timber houses.

Durbuy

The last the cutest. ūüôā In medieval times, Durbuy was an important centre of commerce and industry. In 1331, the town was elevated to the rank of city by John I, Count of Luxemburg, and King of Bohemia. In 1628 by permission of Felipe IV of Spain it becomes the duchy. One of the people connected to the city was the son of Lancelot II: Count of Durbuy.

The Ourthe river flows through the municipality.

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Lier, Belgium

Week 9 of Quarantine after chinese virus we were finally allowed to leave our own city and make a small change in our lives. Belgium is a tiny country but still many options were appearing.

The choice fell on Flanders region. The small city called Lier. Cute, surprisingly big, with canals just like in Amsterdam and heart-melting medieval architecture. Unfortunately, we couldn’t treat ourselves with the lunch in restaurant or a local bier called St Gummarus – according to its patron. Apparently, if you break your bone, you call for his help.

Lier is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Antwerp. It got its name thanks to muddy shores. It is mentioned first time in 7th century.

in 1496 Lier was the scene of the marriage between Philip the Handsome – son of Maximilian of Austria, and Joanna of Castile. This marriage was pivotal to the history of Europe as Charles V, who was born to this marriage (Ghent, 1500), would go on to rule both the Holy Roman Empire and the Spanish Empire.

King Christian II of Denmark, accompanied by his spouse Isabella (sister to Charles V and known as Queen Elisabeth), lived in Lier until 1523, after having been expelled from Denmark by the local nobility while waiting in vain for military support from his brother in law. He attempted again to regain the Danish throne, but ended in eternal prison.

St. Gummarus Church, gothic architecture, 14th century.

The main square is a vivid space, surprisingly big for the small city. A conspicuous feature of the market square is the spot where Lier’s last witchcraft related execution is traditionally believed to have taken place.

Town hall, rococo architecture, 18th century.

Lier has one more interesting thing to visit: Zimmer tower also known as the Cornelius tower, that was originally from 14th century city fortifications. In 1930, astronomer and Louis Zimmer  built the Clock, which is displayed on the front of the tower, and consists of 12 clocks encircling a central one with 57 dials. These clocks showed time on all continents, phases of the moons, times of tides and many other periodic phenomena.

These wonder-clocks were prepared for the 1935 world exhibition in Brussels; later they were demonstrated in the USA. Around one of these dials moves the slowest pointer in the world – its complete revolution will take 25800 years, which corresponds to the period of the precession of the Earth’s axis. The wonder-clocks impressed Albert Einstein, who congratulated Zimmer on the creation of these unusual mechanisms.

At the start of the WWI, King Albert and his Chiefs of Staffs were temporarily headquartered in Lier as German lines advanced.

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Cuba libre in 13 days

Cheese and chalks!

Every corner was wtf, every moment was mind blowing! I don’t know where to start as Cuba is one of these countries that left me speechless. In one same moment I happened to be disappointed and thrilled in the same time. So the best might be just start chronologically and tell you the tales that happened on our way.

We landed to Varadero and immediately went to Matanzas. We had our taxi already arranged by the hosting lady in Matanzas.

Matanzas

Matanzas is a small city next to the Varadero hotels resorts so kinda neglected by the tourists. I found it hypsterish and cute: there are streets falling apart typically for Cuba, the smelly river but lively river coast with bars, small restaurants and artistic shops that are more like garage shops but for Cuban standards these are the galleries.

River San Juan and the city of Matanzas, Cuba, West Indies, Caribbean, Central America

Our host was a nice Lady owning the casa particular where we stayed one night only. She was curious, helpful, offering hospitality and more. We slept in an improvised room with toilets barriers – not walls! Little privacy but we didn’t care. We knew what Cuba is and where we arrived. Except that in developed part of Europe you will not pay more than 15 EUR for this type of accommodation. Here we paid 25.

However, she had a lovely house and garden for the cuban standards thanks to this room renting. I concluded that Cuba is changing quickly from its socialism where richer are getting richer.

The next morning she prepared us breakfast and arranged us the shared taxi to Havana. Cubans don’t have internet – here and there you can go online at some hotspots but only for a while as many people use these hotspots which are 3G only. So no photos no videos – only quick whatsapp message to parents that we arrived safely.

We were sharing our taxi with some two Cubans. The driver was particularly nuts. He was totally against the political system, media manipulation and demanding the private ownership. Me, having the problem to enter the country and being additionally interrogated why I am entering to Cuba – well, I kinda decided to keep my usual political discussed mouth shut up. I was still observing and not sure when is appropriate to speak. I intend never to offend the hosts. And keep myself safe.

The highways is a two way fast road – no middle fence to divide and protect. Quickly I noticed that everybody goes on this highway: from 80 years old cars and trucks til’ carriageways, horses, local field workers and even unsaddled horse wandering arround.

After two hours we arrived to Havana. I got out of the car, stepped into the dog shit and crashed the screen of my phone. The warmest welcome l ever had.

Havana

We passed next to the stadium. Baseball is their national sport. One of the pure things left from the times the US was influencing the country through its mafia and banking system – which was a trigger for Cuban The Revolution in 1959.

The Stadium of La Havana

Havana is the capital city. Founded by the Spanish in the 16th century and due to its strategic location it served as a springboard for the Spanish conquest of the Americas, becoming a stopping point for treasure-laden Spanish galleons returning to Spain. The sinking of the U.S. battleship Maine in Havana’s harbor in 1898 was the immediate cause of the Spanish‚ÄďAmerican War.

We climbed to the first floor of some old house in Havana Vieja. Our host was supposed to be the anesthesiologist. We rang the door bell. Wrong one. We rang the other one. Some Lady opened. Are you Belkis? -Si, porque?

– We have a reservation at your place. – Oh really, ok, what can l do? I have a room but is not ready.

Later we discovered that she pays other person to put her house renting on the internet but this time the person forgot to inform her.

The city attracts over a million tourists annually so the local people quickly discovered the value of foreign currency 25 times stronger than cuban peso (CUP) – trying to gain that one foreign peso (CUC) at every corner pumping the prices, cheating on services and even lying to attract you for some sightseeing. For example, we were about to go to The Museum of Revolution. The boy arrived quickly to us asking if we are going to the Museum and explaining that we shouldn’t go cause it is closed for the lunch time and that we should follow him to go to some bar with some cuban cigars sells offer cause today it is a very special day and all cigars are 50% off. We didn’t follow him, we went to the Museum which was open until 19:00.

Or another typical scam: a girl asked me for some chewing gum (children are not allowed to work nor beg as Cuba provides very good health and education care system which is totally for free). I didn’t have any so she said that today is her birthday and if I could buy her something in a nearest shop. I asked her if she knows the date. She knew. ūüôā So I decided to buy her some package of chewing gums still, I am a human after all.

Few seconds later, she entered to the store, returned the package of chewing gums and got her 1 CUC/ EUR instead.

Nevertheless, I do not recommend to stay no more that two full days in Havana. It stinks, it is Europe way expensive and has not that much to offer as the other locations and cities in Cuba.

We started our exploration with Havana Vieja – old Havana. Old facades that are falling apart, not much of the hygiene on the streets and the stinky canalization since Cubans don’t throw their used toilet paper in the flush but in the trash bin next to it. Lovely!

Let me show you the market:

Conquistador Diego Vel√°zquez founded Havana in 16th century. Soon it attracted the pirates mostly from France like famous Pirate Wooden leg or in french Jambe de Bois.

Hence the french and mostly spanish influence in architecture.

Three centuries later and numerous luxury hotels, casinos and nightclubs were constructed during the 1930s to serve Havana’s burgeoning tourist industry, which greatly benefited by the U.S. prohibition on alcohol from 1920 to 1933. These was the time of art deco buildings in Cuba and its Belle Epoque. In the 1930s, organized crime characters were not unaware of Havana’s nightclub and casino life, and they made their inroads in the city. The US mayor of Havana wanted to create the casino city bigger than Las Vegas of its time! Casino, prostitution and money laundering was happening in the famous hotel buildings like the Hotel Habana Riviera, Hotel Nacional Casino etc. At the time, Havana became an exotic capital of appeal and numerous activities ranging from marinas, grand prix car racing, musical shows, and parks. It was also the favorite destination of sex tourists.

Cubans led by brothers Castro, CheGuevara and C. Cienfuegos decided to end this with the Cuban Revolution of 1959, so the new r√©gime under Fidel Castro promised to improve social services, public housing, and official buildings. Nevertheless, Castro allowed USSR to put nuclear rockets on Cuba (the famous Cuban crisis in 1962) facing Florida, US which is only 40 miles away from Cuban shore. So US decided to make embargo. Cuban’s economy struggled suddenly since most of ts export was towards US. The other Caribbean countries are to poor to trade.

Leaning on USSR – it didn’t last long. USSR fell apart in 1990. Cuba becomes more and more poor, but as Castro says on the national TV: we are happy people, we dance, we don’t live for the money, we are small Nation but great Nation because we faced big USA.

Not like I am a big fan of US Government and its exploration of the Latin American continent for the entire 20th century but there is something wrong in Cubans when they look at tourists as people with dollar sign on their foreheads.

Our second stop was El Capitolio. The neoclassical building – the seat of the Republic of Cuba. Cubans say it is not the replica of Washington DC Capitol but they like to add that it is a meter higher, a meter wider, and a meter longer. ūüôā You do the conclusion here.

Across the street is the Opera house. We had amazing cocktails here with the view on the Capitolio.

Next thing we did was taking an old timer to drive us through the city. We read before on the internet that the ride should not take more than 20 tourist pesos aka CUCs (which is around 20 EUR). However, none of the drivers wanted to take us around for less that 40 CUCs.

Capitolio from the Havana Vieja street

So we got the stroll through Vedado – the district with houses of the rich and embassies. It was developed in the first half of the 20th century, during the Republic period.

In Vedado I saw brand new hotels. The driver explained that the night costs there up to 700 EUR. Later I was walking around these tall buildings again and people were approaching to me saying: Se acabo, se acabo con el socialismo. Meaning: it is finished with socialism. Pointing these huge massive 21 century hotel buildings.

We stopped at La Plaza de la Revolucion.

Plaza de la Revolucion

And then at some park with the statue of John Lennon. Apparently F. Castro did not allow to Cuban people to listen the music on english but Cubans still adored The Beatles. So F. Castro decided to built his statue.

The bar called Le Petit Paris for some cocktails and salsa dance. Never enough of Mojitos and Pina Colada. This is something Cubans really know how to do it – using their best rhum!

The rest of the day we wandered around the city, admiring, re-thinking, analysing, having fun and cocktails! ūüôā I had the best daiquiri in my life!

Of course, live music is in every bar. Salsa is everywhere. And so is the basket with the tips.

Food is bad though, but they will still ask for the tip, or propina in spanish, a EUR to go the toilet and a EUR for the music they just performed in the bar or a restaurant.

Most of the time, due to embargo, many items from the menu are missing. So the best is to go with the rice, lobster and some fish. During our stay, there was no beer for three days. People were literally driving around from the bar to the bar asking if they have some beer to sell. Talking about beer, they like to make it with some lime juice and ice. It is good, unusual but good at that heat ūüôā

One of the bars had a nice examples of paintings in cubismo style. Picasso would be amazed, I am pretty sure.

The next day we were exploring the renovated part of Havana: Plaza de Armas, Cathedral, Plaza de Havana Vieja.

There is something about Cuban dogs always chilling at the middle of the road! XD

We strolled down the famous busy street or in spanish Calle Obispo and arrived to the Museum of The Revolution. The museum is housed in what was the Presidential Palace of all Cuban presidents from Mario Garc√≠a Menocal to Fulgencio Batista – the last US established president in Cuba.

Inside you can see items like the radio CheGuevara used to communcate or the socks of F. Castro. Poorly presented.

However, in the backyards are the vehicles that were taken from the dictator’s Batista regime like the food vendors truck and turned into army defence vehicle. Or the US plane that crashed into the sea near Havana which was long time searched by the US public together with the body of the pilot. US that time didn’t want to admit that they are involved into Cuban Revolution so they were not demanding the body to be returned for the next 40 years.

In front of the Museum is the monument to Jos√© Mart√≠. He was a 19th century Cuban poet and philosopher, considered a Cuban national hero because of his role in the liberation of his country, and he was an important figure in Latin American literature. Very politically active, and considered an important revolutionary philosopher and political theorist. The political scientist in me is now coming to its peak ūüôā  Through his writings and political activity, he became a symbol of Cuba’s bid for independence from Spain in the 19th century, and is referred to as the Apostle of Cuban Independence.

Cooling down at El Malecon. The broad esplanade, roadway, and seawall that stretches for 8 km along the coast in Havana. Watching the new cruise ship entering the city – bringing more money desperately necessary. Or maybe not?

Cubans like to hang out at the street. I was particularly amazed how kids are still playing outdoors, playing football, hide and seek etc.

In the afternoon, exhausted by the heat we decided to visit the House of Ernest Hemingway. In the local bar they told me not to pay more than 15 – 20 CUCs for both ways. There was no driver wanting to take us for less than 40.

It is not allowed to enter to the House but only have a look from the doorstep. However, there were 5 ladies sitting around and looking at tourists. One of them approached to me saying: This is the living room and this is the toilet. – Thank you Captain Obvious!

Hemingway had many books – she said, pointing to the obvious again. I decided to stay away from her. – Look, there is the work of Picasso, the Bull.

Then she said that we should go to Havana like all the other tourists and visit the places there. And of course, she asked for the money explaining how Cuban people is very poor people.

The gardens around the house are very beautiful. I recommend to watch the Pappa Hemingway movie, shooted exactly in this place.

We came back to Havana center to the Floridita bar where he was having his daiquiri. ūüôā

The evening was reserved for the Buena Vista Social Club show. On our way to the building, at least 3 women approached to us starting the random conversation and then suddenly saying how tonight is a special night and all the tickets are 50% off hence we should go to Buena Vista Social Club and that in fact it is very close, just here!

Vi√Īales

Sharing the car again with some old couple from Finland and a girl from Denmark. Two hours on a cuban styled highway. Before we arrived to this city, the driver decided to stop at some local farm or how they say in Cuba – una finca of the tobacco production, manual of course.

A typical tourist trap where they sell uncertified cuban cigars but we didn’t care. We were enjoying what we were seeing and learning. Plus, I met my Austrian friend that I haven’t seen for years! Small world, isn’t it? ūüôā

When we arrived to the Pinar del Rio valley, to the city of Vinales I have noticed that tourism there already changed lots of things. Houses were new, reconstructed, more equipped (I mean, better shower and the toilet that is not falling apart).

The city is famous for the valley and its nature, the tobacco fields around and the cliffs painted by the hand from the pre-historical times. We decided to do the horse riding through the tobacco fields and cliffs and degustating local version of rum made of the special plant Guayaba only growing here in Vinales. They said so.

The biggest rain shower ever fell down on us and moistened me and my horse Mandarina. El sol del Caribe.

Moving forward, from the North West of the island towards middle south on the other side of it.

We planned to go to Trinidad and after it to the city found by French. We couldn’t as we lost lots of time in the meantime. We shared a minibus which happened to be the long 1952 chevrolet where they fir 8 young people from all over the Europe and the driver. We had to drive first to Havana as there is no other road and then down to Trinidad.

Ode to the socialism on our way to Trinidad:

Trinidad

We arrived in the late afternoon to the city of Trinidad. It is the colonial old town with cobblestone streets. I loved it! So much different from weird and stinky Havana. And local people and more calm and less pushy.

Its neo-baroque main square, Plaza Mayor, is surrounded by grand colonial buildings. We entered to some restaurant with the terrace and enjoyed the great sunset.

The Trinidad cocktails is a must! With traditionally bad food. But who cares, Cuba Libre! ūüôā

Sleeping dogs again…

That night we decided to do some proper rum tasting. We started with rum blanco, the Havana Club of 7 years and Rio Anejo of 15 years.

We knew that the next day we will spend at the beach. After 5 days of wandering around it was time to chill for a day.

The third day in Trinidad we went a bit out of the city. First we went out of the tourist center and faced the real Cuba again. Poor houses, stinky smell, canalisation on the road, dogs licking it flies all around.

The afternoon we spent in the Valle de los Ingenios. It is the valley that used to be full of sugar cane fields and slaves working on it. We visited the 2 haciendas where Dom Pedro lived with his wife and a daughter, having the sugar production thanks to the massive slaving he kept behind the house.

The house was yet to be reconstructed again. I asked the local guide where is the furniture. He didn’t have the answer. Perhaps it was eaten by the Revolution, I thought?

Later he claimed how the nowadays slavery is in the money and capitalism which Cubans are resisting to gloriously even though they were hungry of the oil and flour in the 90s after the collapse of the USSR. I told him I am coming from Croatia and survived the war in the 90s.

There was a Belfry in front of the House of Dom Pedro. It was used as a guarding tower, and belling the slaves to come back to their shelters as the day on the plantage finished. The higher the tower, the richer the family.

Next to this improvised bath thub of Dom Pedro, just in front of the dwellings of the female slaveries, more than 50 bottles of wine were found. You do the math here.

Archaeologist depicted all the brutality that was happening here. Slaves chopped and in chains, their feces used fr the fertilisation of the soil etc.

We were driven to another hacienda. This one has been turned into the restaurant, had lots of furniture, a very big belfry and loads of local people selling souvenirs while being pushy. Even the our cuban driver was upset saying it is not authentic anymore.

Finally, as driving through this rich land, he mentioned that in these fields and mountains many Contra revolutionaries that were against F. Castro were hiding and plotting their attacks on Castro’s regime.

He brought us to the last stop: the sugar cane factory. After the discovery of the steam engine and abolished slavery, the production of the sugar became industrial. This factory was productive until the fall of USSR.

We finished the day with local cocktails: canchanchara and trinidad. And the traditional dish called Ropa Vieja, meaning the old clothes. It is the chopped lamb with some rice.

Santiago de Cuba

The 12 hours bus ride for the tourists only (but drivers picks up locals as well) turned to be 15 hours. Why to start on time? Why not to board all 50 tourists in the bus and let them sit one hour before the ride?

During our ride we passed through the cities like:

  • Camaguey – founded in 16th century by some spanish colonist, famous for Ten Years War against Spain.
  • Holguin – the location where Christopher Columbus landed
  • Bayamo – where the cuban anthem was composed. Also, the city where Carlos Manuel de C√©spedes – a cuban revolutionary hero, and a plantation owner – freed his slaves and made the declaration of Cuban independence in 1868 which started the Ten Years’ War which ultimately led to Cuban independence.

We arrived around 23:00. The taxi drivers were fighting for us at the bus station. I decided to trust to some young black guy with dreadlocks. It was a mistake. He packed us in the old russian Lada, I got stuck for some wire. I asked if 5 CUC is ok. He said 20 would be fine. So we payed 15 EUR for a 5 mins ride to our hotel. The car almost died at the hill before our hotel. The guy was explaining to me that the car is old, needs more gasoline and because it is night so the prices are hire. I was furious so I almost decided to stop the ride and continue walking. The 1litre of the gasoline costs a bit less than one EUR here in Santiago. Not to mention that he wanted to give me back money in CUP (currency for Cubans which is 25 less valuable) instead of CUC.

The hotel was amazing. A real spanish colonial architecture. No wonder, since Spaniards firstly arrived here, built the city and then moved the capital to Havana. So there is always a bit of the competition between these two cities.

We fell asleep as dead. The room had 30 years old chinese air conditioning but we dint care. We just needed a shower and the bed.

The next morning was the hottest. Santiago is in the pure south of the island and more close to the Carribbean temperatures and lifestyle. Even if it was winter there was 29 degrees. Locals had socks and long sleeves in the morning. Cause it is winter time!

We visited the Bacardi’s house. The guy who started the Bacardi rum production. A mason who liked to collect the artifacts from around the world so his house is kinda museum of the Cuban history containing the artifacts from the pre-colombian indigenous people Tanejo or the egyptian mummy that he brought after his travel to Egypt in 19th century. I mean, to be honest, there was no souvenirs that time, right? Totally understandable.

We continued exploring the old streets. There is not much toursits in the streets so the locals are pushy. Sometimes in a good will, sometimes just to tell you in which restaurant you should go cause they get provision.

Needless to say that I had very much difficulty to understand their spanish.

The Cathedral Basilica of Our Lady of the Assumption was built in 16th century and is more beautiful than the Cathedral in Havana. I told you – competition!

The Balcony of the already mentioned Diego Vel√°zquez – spanish discoverer and later mayor of the city was built in the 16th century, where from he was watching the maritime traffic to avoid surprise attacks of the pirates and corsairs. The building was finished many years later due to the constant interruptions for fighting against the indian uprisings that needed both money and men destinated to the ravelin.

Little bit more of the lifestyle of the Cubans in Santiago:

We discovered the school of F. Castro but we were not allowed to make photos. He went to Jesuit school. Just like Macron. ūüėõ Next to it was the building of the police station during the time of his rival Batista. Apparently next to it was the house where F. Castro lived but I could not locate it if it really was there since the locals were giving me mixed instructions. ??

The long white building is the Jezuit school of F. Castro, the yellow building is the former Batista police station where F. Castro was imprisoned twice

And strolling down the city to the sea.

Time to chill next to the sea.

The Museum of Rum. Literally the 3 rooms and quick peak to the nowadays factory and its machines – some three window glasses behind, and the cup of taste of the rum Santiago de Cuba. Which stands against the rum from Havana Club. Competition again.

Be careful of another potential scam! Bacardi rum doent exist in Cuba anymore.

Being the mayor of Santiago de Cuba, Bacardi family remained in Cuba with the difficult task of sustaining the company during a period of war. The women in the family were exiled in Kingston, Jamaica. After the Cuban War of Independence and the US occupation of Cuba, “The Original Cuba Libre” and the Daiquiri were both created, using Bacardi rum. During the 1959 Revolution, the Bacardi family acted as an intermediary between the revolutionaries and the CIA to assuage the latter’s concerns. Family members, employees, and facilities were put to use by the movement and the company supported the revolution publicly with advertisements and parties. But their support turned to opposition as the pro-Soviet Che Guevara wing of the movement began to dominate and as Castro turned against their interest.

 The Bacardi family and the company left Cuba after the Castro regime confiscated the company’s Cuban assets on 15 October 1960, particularly nationalizing and banning all private property on the island as well as all bank accounts.

We wanted to go to the Cemetery of Santa Ifigenia. Suddenly this boy appears on his ripsaw bicycle and says 5 CUCs but for 10 he brings us to the city later on.

He didn’t bring us to the city later but to Plaza de la Revolucion which was easier for him to bike and he asked 12 CUCs because he had an offer from other tourists but he ditched them off because of us. Really??? Is he calculating the time and efforts against the profit? How is that called? Oh yeah – capitalism ūüôā Nooooo…… :O

Nevertheless, the Cemetary where all the greats are burried. Including F. Castro – very simple and nice grave, the Bacardi with his mason pyramide, Cespuedes etc.

In Cuba – people stand in line. Waiting for groceries. We witnessed for this so many times. Sometimes they wait in line for the other people and make money out of it. Sometimes they fight who will enter first as the groceries are missing. We witnessed that too.

Santa Clara

Again the 10 hours ride with the Viazul bus for the tourists only but this time during the night so we slept until the morning. We picked up many locals on our way. God knows where were they going. We ride again through Carretera Central through the same villages. And finally we arrived to the city of Che Guevara – where the last battle of The Revolution appeared.

I have to say, it was the poorest city we visited, and the most poluted with garbage in the streets and river. But people, they live of Che Guevara and don:t push for the peso.

Travelling entire night, we quickly changed our clothes in nasty nasty dirty toilets that are charged 1 EUR. No soap, no flush. First stop was neoclassical normand church. Don’t ask how this occurred here.

Next stop was the open musuem of trams which Che Guevara attacked in Movimiento 26 Julio hence the signs M-26-7

The trains full of weapons were sent by Batista from Havana towards the South where from F. Castro started the Revolution. After the attack, Batista ran away to Florida.

The last stop was Che’s mausoleum, There is a 7 meters statue above it and the monument with his last letter to Castro after the success of the Cuban Revolution explaining how he needs to continue his battle against the imperialism. He was that time the Ambassador in United Nations, the Director of the Cuban National Bank and the hell of sexy revolutionist that went to fight to China, Colombia, Angola, Congo and finally died by assassination of CIA.

I know you are here to kill me. Shoot, you are only going to kill a man not the Revolution.

Apparently the mausoleum contains his grave, although controversial as he was killed in the late 1960s but body found in early 90s and brought to Cuba…

We ended our day in Santa Clara sitting in some coffee place of some Spanish guy who arrived some 20 years ago to Cuba to visit and stayed for ever. His bar is full of marxist collection.

Varadero

Our final destination – the hotel resorts. And we really needed it.

The internet was a bit better, the food was still bad, cocktails were amazing, beaches stunned and tourists were mostly mid-level Russians. And so were their actions.

We spent entire day on the beach having cocktails and playing big boarded chess. Oh what a times!

The resort is total tourist trap and less authentic to Cuba. The Beatles and american rock music of 90s screams from everywhere. The restaurants are trying to imitate the classy European restaurants so you can eat some fondue in Cuba of goat cheese from Cuba, or have pizza 4 Formaggi but only 2 types of cheese – cause embargo!

In the evening we went to Cabaret show! It was amazing! ūüôā

So long Cuba! You hit me hard but I still love you and would recommend you always. Don|t change to much, stay authentic as much as possible! Authentic and clean!

Hasta la victoria!